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Kihei-Wailea Rotarians come to the rescue | Maui News

Kihei-Wailea Rotarians come to the rescue |  Maui News

Group to provide 28 tubes designed to help prevent ocean drownings

 

Apr 30, 2017

The Rotary Club of Kihei-Wailea is ready to install 28 rescue tubes next month at beaches across South Maui to aid residents and visitors in waters that have accounted for more than a quarter of drownings on the island over the past decade, the nonprofit said.

“We’re really excited because this saves lives,” Rotarian MaryMargaret Baker said.

The tubes had been set for installation Saturday, but rainy weather postponed the work until next month.

The bright “banana-yellow” cylinders are approximately 50 inches long and can keep three adults afloat. They will be placed every 300 feet starting at Kalama Beach Park’s north end to Cove Park, Charley Young Beach and all three Kamaole Beach parks.

Source: www.mauinews.com/news/local-news/2017/04/kihei-wailea-rotarians-come-to-the-rescue/

Please Help Save Ocean Sports schools from 400% Fee hike

The Mayor’s FY2018 budget includes a 400% increase for county beach access permits for CORA schools: Surfing, Windsurf, Kite, Kayak, SCUBA, Outrigger, and Snorkel. (CORA stands for Commercial Ocean Recreation Activity). This Fee Hike threatens the existence of small business like surf schools and SCUBA instructors and their ability to continue to provide quality instruction for locals and visitors. Please sign the Change.org petition below.

https://www.change.org/p/bf-committee-mauicounty-us-save-ma…

The Mayor’s FY2018 budget includes a 400% increase for county beach access permits for Ocean Sports Schools for SCUBA, Surfing, Kayak, Windsurfing, Snorkel,…
change.org

Paddle Safety Course

Paddle Safety Course

THE comprehensive canoe, kayak,
& paddleboard safety course

Hop in or on, and stand up and cheer! If it’s got a paddle it’s in this course. Including everything stand-up paddleboard (SUP). Just be careful standing up in those kayaks and canoes, in fact we’ll teach you how (or when not to). Push off and get started!

Check out this free Paddle Safety Course at BOATERexam.com!

Source: www.boaterexam.com/paddling/

EMS & Injury Prevention System Branch | Information on Drowning Prevention

EMS & Injury Prevention System Branch | Information on Drowning Prevention

Drowning is the 5th leading cause of fatal injuries in Hawaii, with 385 drowning fatalities occurring during the 5-year period from 2010-2014, averaging 57 per year.  Among non-residents during this time period, drownings were the 3rd leading cause of any type of death, behind heart disease and cancer, and the leading cause of injury-related death, ahead of suicide, falls, motor vehicle crashes, and other causes.   Compared to non-residents (183), there were slightly less resident drowning deaths during this time period (176), mostly while swimming, free diving, and unknown activity. Most non-resident drowning deaths occurred while snorkeling, swimming and unknown activity. The rate of fatal ocean drowning for non-residents in Hawaii is about eight times higher than for residents.  Kauai has the highest ten year rate (/100,000) of total (resident and non-resident) fatal ocean drownings (82.5), followed by Maui (64.6), Big Island (51.8) and Oahu (27.2).

For every fatal drowning, it is estimated that 13 non-fatal drownings occur, some of which may be associated with long term disability.  In addition to the pain and suffering, the “comprehensive effects of drowning include the economic loss (victim’s productivity loss and the expenses relating to the event) and the value of lost quality of life associated with the death or injury.” (Lifeguard Effectiveness: A Report of the Working Group, CDC 2001).  The United States Lifesaving Association estimates that that one percent of the total rescues made by lifeguards would have resulted in a drowning death in the absence of lifeguards.   In 2015 alone, county ocean lifeguards in the state of Hawaii reported performing over 4,000 ocean rescues.

Source: health.hawaii.gov/injuryprevention/home/drowning-prevention/information/

Save

Save

Drowning Prevention in Hawaii

Drowning Prevention – Each week in Hawaii, at least one person fatally drowns. About one third of drownings occur in swimming pools. The majority of drownings in Hawaii are ocean-related, and half of those fatalities are among visitors. As an island state, it is essential that we create a safe environment and provide residents and visitors with information they need to have a safe and enjoyable experience in and around the water.

Injury Prevention System

Ocean Safety Tip: Don’t Touch The Poor Urchins!

Ocean Safety Tip: Don’€™t Touch The Poor Urchins!

Diving provides us with opportunities to observe and passively interact with the many amazing creatures of the sea. Most of these encounters result in experiences that are truly memorable for the diver, but in some rare circumstances we may manage to get ourselves injured.

spiny urchinUrchins are common in Hawaiian waters and are often seen by surfers, snorkelers and divers. Most diver injuries are accidental, such as a diver with poor buoyancy control accidentally landing on an urchin or a tired diver accidentally grabbing onto a stonefish. Both of these situations are easy to control by following safe diving practices and knowing your personal limitations.  Sometimes the surge or an oblivious dive buddy may push you into one; it’s not always the diver’s fault either.

One of the most common injuries our ocean-goers face is a patch of urchin spines, no longer attached to the critter but embedded in their skin. This is a very easy injury to avoid, as urchins move veeeeeery sloooooowly while they graze upon algae on the reef. Frequently referred to as a “Hawaiian Tattoo,” the ink and even spine tips can remain in your skin for weeks or even months after the spines have broken off. Sometimes the lingering presence of the pigment gives a false impression that there are still spines under the skin.

That title might sound a little surprising to you, but how would you feel if someone came along and broke off your body parts? It’s not like…

Source: www.mauidreamsdiveco.com/2015/05/Ocean-Safety-Tip-Don-t-Touch-The-Poor-Urchins

Scuba Diving in Maui: Insider Tips from a Local

Scuba Diving in Maui: Insider Tips from a Local

There are a few things to know about scuba diving in Maui that will make your time here easier and will help you get the most out of your dives, so without further ado, here they are:

Calm Dive Conditions in Maui1. The diving here (from shore or by boat) is best early in the morning. During early morning hours, the light is good and the water is at its calmest. When you book dives here and get check-in times that range from 6-7 in the morning, it’s not because the dive operators want to torture you; the weather patterns here include trade winds that typically start coming up between 11 and 1. Once that happens, the surface becomes choppy, making entries and exits as well as boat rides against the wind less desirable. The windiest months of the year happen during summertime and with higher air temperatures, the stronger trades also make life above the surface more tolerable! That said, Maui is pretty much an early to bed, early to rise community – they don’t call 9:00 pm “Maui midnight” for nothing!

Maui scuba diving shop, guided shore dives, diving courses and training, scooter dives and night dives, diving equipment supplies and rentals based in South Kihei, Maui. Open 7 days a week.

Source: www.mauidreamsdiveco.com/blog/69/Scuba-Diving-in-Maui-Insider-Tips-from-a-Local